5 Tourist Destinations to visit in Mexico City

Mexico City is the place that inspired MEXI.CLOTHING. It’s vibrant, exciting and stylish.

There’s probably 50 great tourist attractions in the city, but we’ve narrowed it down to 5 that we’ve visited and want to share with you.

Coyoacán

Coyoacán, or more specifically the historic area of Villa Coyoacán, is the closest you’ll come in Mexico City to experiencing a traditional Mexican town. It was probably my favourite district that I visited during my first trip to Mexico. It has beautiful painted houses, leafy squares and a huge market selling food, souvenirs, clothing and just about everything else. At weekends, an estimated 70,000 people visit the area, giving the market a thriving atmosphere. I loved the historic feel of the place and authenticity of the food in the restaurants and markets.

Museo Nacional de Antropología

A fascinating history of Mexico and its people can be found within the Anthropological Museum. Exhibits are a mix of replicas and original artifacts including significant Aztec pieces. I didn’t really know much about the ethnic and cultural diversity of Mexico - until I came to this museum.  Architecturally, the museum is an interesting spot. The exhibition rooms surround a central plaza which is covered by a giant concrete umbrella, supported by a single pillar. Perfect for an Instagram photo. As well as being worth a visit to learn more about Mexico, it’s located within walking distance of Paseo de la Reforma, one of the city’s main boulevards.

Teotihuacán

Whilst technically speaking, Teotihuacán may be outside of the city, it’s certainly still worth a visit. It makes the list as it’s the most raw historical experience possible. Quite simply, the Pyramid of the Sun (the largest one), is massive. Its sides are steep and jagged. At 70 metres high, it’s imposing, raw and a little bit dangerous. Reading about and imagining the civilisation that created the Teotihuacán site is mind-boggling, and actually quite disturbing.

Castillo de Chapultepec

Castillo de Chapultepec (Chapultepec Castle) is the only royal castle in North America and acquired its current look in the mid 19th century. It offers an historical insight into colonial Mexico in addition to views of the city, which are worth visiting for alone. In Mexico there is a strange mix of pride and regret at the country’s history as a Spanish colony. In Britain we accept that our royal history is very much still a part of the culture. By contrast in Mexico, the European style monarchy has been consigned to the past, and it’s fascinating to see it preserved in a limited number of places - such as at Chapultepec Castle.

Palacio de Bellas Artes

Constructed over 30 years in several stages from 1904, the Bellas Artes site has Aztec origins. The building is a cultural hub in the centre of Mexico City. Exhibitions include, but are not limited to, theatre, music literature, painting, sculpture and photography. Bellas Artes is a mixture of Art Nouveau style exterior and an Art Deco interior. The marble surfacing and imposing dark metal balconies give the interior an elegance and sophistication which contrasts with the hustle and bustle of the streets of the city centre outside.

If you enjoyed our picks of Mexico City's tourist attractions, be sure to read about the city's style spots.

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January Studio Shots

 Traditional scenes in Coyoac á n ( photo )

Traditional scenes in Coyoacán (photo)

 The courtyard at Museo Nacional de Anthropología

The courtyard at Museo Nacional de Anthropología

  The Pyramid of the Sun

The Pyramid of the Sun

 Interior of Palacio Bellas Artes ( photo )

Interior of Palacio Bellas Artes (photo)

 Castillo de Chapultepec ( photo )

Castillo de Chapultepec (photo)

Fraser BellComment